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IBM’s Veterans Employment Initiative, part of the IBM Impact Grant portfolio, connects IBM expert software trainers with qualified participants for five days of instruction on IBM® i2® Analyst’s Notebook®. At the conclusion of the instructional session, participants may take the exam for certification as an advanced data analyst. Employers are expected to fill nearly 200,000 jobs over the next few years with those holding credentials like those provided by this new program. Thus far, 98 percent of the 150 program participants have attained certification as advanced data analysts. And 25 percent of them have accepted positions with IBM or other participating employers. More than 350 veterans will have participated in the IBM program by the end of 2016.

By Diane Melley, Debbie Landers and Robert Griffin

Data analytics is key to ensuring that organizations today remain competitive and employees engaged. As a result, industry experts cite data analytics as one of the fastest growing career fields, with a shortage of at least 200,000 data analysts to fill corporate data analyst jobs by 2018.

An IBM i2® Analyst’s Notebook® Class in San Antonio, Texas

An IBM i2® Analyst’s Notebook® Class in San Antonio, Texas

With qualified IT candidates in short supply, IBM is taking a new approach to recruitment by working with Veteran Service Organizations to help train and place veterans in civilian jobs. Led by IBM’s Corporate Citizenship team and funded via IBM’s Impact Grant program, the new Veterans Employment Accelerator grant program lets veterans capitalize on their unique skill sets and connect their talents to the business world. IBM’s Cloud and Analytics Software and data analyst training teams are donating their time to teach and certify veterans with industry-ready data analyst skills to help them start new IT careers.

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(Brazilian Portuguese Version Below)

Few people had heard of the Zika virus before 2015, when it began rapidly spreading in the Americas, particularly in Brazil. The virus is mostly spread by mosquitoes, although sexual and blood transmission are also possible. Some pregnant women who have contracted the Zika virus have given birth to infants with a condition called microcephaly, which results in severe brain development issues. In other cases, adults and children who contract the Zika virus have suffered paralysis and other neurological problems.

Zika Virus Image (Copyright John Liebler, www.ArtoftheCell.com. All rights reserved. Used by permission.)

Zika Virus Image (Copyright John Liebler, www.ArtoftheCell.com. All rights reserved. Used by permission.)

Currently, there is no treatment for the Zika virus and no vaccine. Given that Zika has quickly become an international public health concern, my team and I are working with researchers here in Brazil as well as in the United States to look for possible treatments, and we are using IBM World Community Grid to accelerate our project.

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I was born in Trinidad and began my life in America at the age of two. Like many families, my parents came to New York seeking the American Dream and a better future for me and my sisters. After our arrival, my family moved around a bit until we finally settled in a part of Brooklyn we could afford.

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After briefly attending a neighborhood public school, my parents transferred me to
St. Rita, a Catholic middle school, hoping to get me away from the violence and disarray of my surroundings.

Growing up in a religious household, the strict atmosphere of St. Rita was nothing new. Back home in Trinidad, discipline and religion went hand in hand, and my parents made sure to bring along those principles with them, to raise me with respect, determination and will—which I applied to every aspect of my life and for which I will forever be thankful.

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Janiel Richards, 18, is the oldest of four siblings and recently graduated from P-Tech in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, where she earned both her high school diploma and her Associate in Applied Science degree in computer information systems from the New York City College of Technology. There are now 60 P-TECH schools and 200 industry partners. A version of this article originally appeared on GradNation.org.

Related Resources:

Visit P-TECH.org

Read more blogs about IBM P-TECH

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May, 6th 2016
11:54
 

By Debbie Landers and Robert Griffin

Data analytics is key to ensuring that organizations today remain competitive and employees engaged. As a result, industry experts cite data analytics as one of the fastest growing career fields, with a shortage of at least 200,000 data analysts to fill corporate data analyst jobs by 2018.

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With qualified IT candidates in short supply, IBM is taking a new approach to recruitment by working with Veteran Service Organizations to help train and place veterans in civilian jobs. Led by IBM’s Corporate Citizenship team and funded via IBM’s Impact Grant program, the new Veterans Employment Accelerator grant program lets veterans capitalize on their unique skill sets and connect their talents to the business world. IBM’s Cloud and Analytics Software and data analyst training teams are donating their time to teach and certify veterans with industry-ready data analyst skills to help them start new IT careers.

Together with our program partners Corporate America Supports You and Military Spouse Corporate Career Network (CASY-MSCCN), veterans have the opportunity to participate in free IBM i2 Analyst Notebook software training sessions offered throughout the U.S. Each training opportunity is an intensive, week-long session that prepares graduates to take the certification exam to become an advanced data analyst.

Recruiting vets is one of the many ways that HR is evolving in the world of big data and cognitive computing. They bring tremendous value to a civilian employer. What they need – after many years in the highly regimented environment of the military – is guidance to leverage their skills and have an opportunity to contribute.

Having placed thousands of veterans into suitable jobs in the U.S. for the last two years,
the program has expanded to the UK and Canada. We’re on track to train 300+ trainees by end of this year, and invite other corporations to partner with us and join our ever-growing list of partners supporting this program, including Boeing, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, USAA and Aetna.

Through programs like the Veterans Employment Accelerator program, our service men and women can discover commonalities between their military background and the requirements of civilian industry, fill a critical IT need and begin the next chapter of their lives.

Debbie Landers is General Manager of Smarter Workforce at IBM. Robert Griffin is
General Manager of Safer Planet at IBM. A version of this article first appeared on HR.com.

Related Resources:

From Military Service to Data Analytics: Helping Vets with Career Transformation

A Family Tradition of Service

Learn More About IBM Impact Grants

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At this week’s Milken Institute Global Conference, I joined an exciting and important discussion about closing the disconnect between education and college and career readiness. Watch and share the video of this discussion to learn how public-private partnerships – not finger pointing or assessing blame – are essential to ensuring that today’s and tomorrow’s high school graduates have the academic and workplace skills
they need to succeed.

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A former Deputy Chancellor of the New York City Schools, Stanley S. Litow is
IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Responsibility & Corporate Affairs and an architect
of the IBM P-TECH grade 9 to 14 program.

Related Resources:

Why America Needs P-TECH to Succeed

To Innovate, We Must Educate

VIDEO: Creating Pathways to STEM Careers

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Ghana has long been a launch pad for groundbreaking international collaboration. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy sent the very first group of Peace Corps volunteers to Ghana. Eight years ago, the inaugural IBM Corporate Service Corps team, which brings IBM consultants, services, and talent to the world pro bono, also traveled to Ghana. For both organizations, it seemed logical to launch the first IBM Corporate Service Corps partnership project with the Peace Corps in Ghana.

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Together, the preeminent international service organization of the United States and the largest corporate global pro bono program are using their skills and talents in tandem to work together with global communities to tackle their most pressing needs.

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Gina Tesla is Director of Corporate Citizenship Initiatives with IBM Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs.

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Every year on Earth Day, we stop to celebrate individuals and organizations that are doing their part, and more, to protect our planet’s future.

While these efforts are worth applauding, they must be sustained to make a difference.

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IBM has been firmly committed to environmental leadership for over four decades, and we have produced a record of significant results. Our company has aggressively reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions since 1990. We’ve also had an annual worldwide energy conservation goal since 1996.

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IBM Corporate Services Corps (CSC) program gives IBMers the unique opportunity to develop their leadership skills by going on a community-based assignment in an emerging market to help communities around the world solve critical problems. The CSC program brings IBM consultants, services and talent to the world pro bono. As the program helps global communities solve problems, IBMers receive leadership and development training and IBM develops new markets — building on its network of global leaders. As of 2016, 2,800 IBMers from 60 countries have deployed to 37 countries and partnered with host organizations on more than 1,000 projects worth $70 million.

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Gina Tesla is Director of Corporate Citizenship Initiatives with IBM Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs.

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Suicide is a significant cause of death in many OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries and Belgium is among the most affected European nations. A key strategy in the prevention of suicide in the Flanders Region is the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, coordinated and operated by the Flemish Suicide Prevention Center. Here, skilled and trained volunteer counselors offer 24/7 support to individuals in a suicidal crisis, along with their relatives or friends. We offer this support via telephone, chat or e-mail, and all consultations are anonymous.

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Last year, we doubled the size of our volunteer staff – from 65 to 130. Our counselors work mostly from home in virtual teams, so it is essential that they have access to smart tools that enable efficient interaction, provide easy access to information and allow effective planning. Through an Impact Grant, IBM helped us develop and deploy a powerful new intranet to enable our team to do its life-saving work.

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Zithulele Hospital is a medical marvel. It provides quality primary care for a community of 130,000 people scattered across part of the rural Eastern Cape of South Africa with just 146 beds and 13 fulltime doctors. Zithulele’s situation illustrates one of the major public health challenges in the world today: there aren’t enough doctors in rural communities. “We work hard to provide both accessibility and quality healthcare, but it’s a major day-to-day challenge,” says Dr. Ben Gaunt, manager of clinical operations at the hospital.

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That challenge was also the focus of a six-member team of IBMers who visited the
hospital last fall during a three-week engagement in South Africa. Theirs was one of
two pilot projects that helped shape a major new corporate social responsibility initiative, IBM Health Corps, which is aimed at addressing global public health problems. The other pilot addressed obesity and shortened lifespans in Calderdale, a community in West Yorkshire, England.

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Related Resources
IBM Announces Health Corps to Help Communities Around the World
Address Public Health Challenges

eWeek: Big Blue Launches IBM Health Corps

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