Instrumented Interconnecteds Intelligent
IBM Leadership
February 12th, 2015
15:21
 

President Obama’s proposal to provide free community college across the U.S. is expected to cost upwards of $1.4 billion in 2016 and $60 billion over the next 10 years. Can America afford it? The real question is: How can we not?

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In my latest article for The Huffington Post, you’ll read about the latest data showing a disturbing and widening gap in college completion rates between the nation’s rich and poor students. But you’ll also read about an innovative and collaborative solution that’s helping everyday students – many from low-income families – unlock their potential for success.

Find out how this innovation that’s connecting education to jobs has grown from one to
27 schools in less than four years, and will scale to reach 100,000 students nationwide
by 2016. And learn why Congress must fund and modernize the legislation that provides critical funding for programs that prepare our young people to enter the real 21st
century workforce.

A former Deputy Chancellor of the New York City Schools, Stanley S. Litow is
IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs and President
of the IBM International Foundation.

Related Resources:

Read More About the P-TECH Grades 9 to 14 Model

IBM Partnerships Enable Nationwide Spread of P-TECH Schools

IBM Unveils New Playbook to Expand Innovative P-TECH Schools Nationwide

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IBM created the P-TECH grades 9 through 14 schools model because we recognized a serious societal problem, and had the skill and desire to address it. In short, too many of America’s young people were being trapped in unending cycles of poverty (whether or not they could find full-time or part-time work), while American industry – starved for skilled workers – needed to re-sharpen its competitive edge. The solution was not to write checks, but to get involved. Only by fostering a community of stakeholders including educators, employers, governments, parents, teachers and students would we solve a problem together that no single sector could solve alone.

2014_11-12_P-TECH_Infographic_narrow (381x500)Click here to view full size graphic

Each P-TECH school is a partnership that unites school districts, community colleges
and corporate sponsors in service to a singular goal – to help our young people succeed.
P-TECH schools help students succeed by focusing their education on academic rigor and workplace readiness, by providing each young scholar with a mentor, and by making each graduate first in line for employment consideration with the school’s corporate partner. What began in 2011 with one school in Brooklyn, New York is spreading to nearly 40 schools around the nation, and could reach 100 schools by 2016.

What’s P-TECH’s “secret sauce”? We’re sharing the recipe through a new website which houses our updated digital playbook. Together, these resources deliver the tools, case studies, research and guidance that school districts, higher education institutions and businesses can use to establish new P-TECH schools. Whether you are an employer, an educator, a government or community leader, a parent or several of the above, we invite you to examine and share these materials.

Get involved. Speak up. Take action to provide our children with the 21st century education they need and deserve.

Related Resources:

IBM Unveils New Playbook to Expand Innovative P-TECH Schools Across the Nation

New York Governor Cuomo Announces Second Round Winners of P-TECH Awards

Download the New P-TECH Playbook

VIDEO: Why Six Years of High School Is Catching On (PBS NewsHour)

VIDEO: The School That Is Changing American Education (TIME Magazine)

VIDEO: High Schools “made with IBM”

“The School That Will Get You a Job” (TIME Magazine; subscription required)

 

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Since the latest outbreak of Ebola in sub-Saharan Africa, thousands of people have died from the disease by official count, and the true death toll may be much higher. While Ebola is difficult to contract unless one is exposed to the bodily fluids of a person in the latter stages of the illness, poverty and lack of proper facilities and equipment throughout Africa have made the disease difficult to contain. Add to that the visceral aspects of the affliction, and you have a formula for panic and the spread of misinformation in addition to the real and serious dangers posed by the disease.

That’s why IBM has stepped up to combat the Ebola crisis where it lives – deploying our expertise in disaster relief & recovery, data analysis, mobile technology and cloud computing to help governments, health care workers and others on the ground get the tools and information they need to stop Ebola in its tracks.

  • The IBM Research Lab in Nairobi, Kenya – the continent’s first technology research lab – is collaborating with Sierra Leone’s Open Government Initiative, Cambridge University, Airtel and Kenya’s Echo Mobile on an SMS/toll-free communications channel to collect and share information, and track the disease.
  • IBMers around the world are taking a leading role in the creation of an Ebola Open Data Repository which will use IBM’s SoftLayer cloud technology to provide governments, aid agencies and researchers with free and open access to globally-contributed data related to Ebola.
  • After deploying best practices in the fight against Ebola, Nigeria has recently
    been declared free of the disease. An IBM donation of Connections technology to Nigeria’s Lagos State Government will support the country’s preparedness against future outbreaks.

Read more about IBM’s full portfolio of responses to the Ebola crisis at the links below.

Stanley S. Litow is IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs and President of the IBM International Foundation.

More Information About IBM’s Responses to the Ebola Crisis:

IBM Launches Humanitarian Initiatives to Help Contain Ebola Outbreak in Africa

IBM Research – Africa Uses Technology in Ebola Humanitarian Efforts

How Big Data Can Help Beat Ebola

World Health Organization: Ebola Virus Disease

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Cloud computing. Data analytics. Mobile computing. Social business. Evolving individually, any one of these developments would be a disruption in the way individuals, societies and businesses relate to each other. Taken together, Cloud, Big Data, Mobile and Social are affecting nothing less than a global transformation of the way organizations operate. But IBM’s commitment to innovation and transformation goes beyond business strategy; it embraces our corporate culture. And in no way is that alignment more evident than in our approach to corporate responsibility.

2013_CR_ReportClick here to read the 2013 IBM Corporate Responsibility Report

In our 2013 Corporate Responsibility Report, IBM details the many ways in which we are integrating corporate citizenship with business strategy to help transform such essential challenges as improving education (where we are redefining the pathway from high school to college and career), community engagement (through which IBM’s technology and top talent are addressing the challenges of civil society and the not-for-profit community), and improving the quality of urban life by helping cities and regions get “smarter.” Through it all, IBM’s approach to corporate citizenship via creative public-private partnerships delivers sustainable value to our beneficiaries, enables our partners to address critical societal issues in innovative ways, and helps IBMers acquire and embrace new skills.

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Data digitization and IBM mobile technology will transform accessibility by making everything easier to use. For the worldwide population of more than 1 billion people with disabilities – in addition to older persons, novice technology users and people with language, learning, literacy or situational challenges – IBM is in a unique position to lead the movement to broaden the definitions of accessibility and inclusion.

IBM has been a pioneer in accessibility since 1914.

IBM has been a pioneer in accessibility since 1914.

The core design and usability standards that we establish in this new world of cognitive computing, mobile access, social collaboration and enhanced access will accelerate new thinking about accessibility in an era of personalization, mobility and learning systems.

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IBM Supplier Connection helps America’s small businesses gain access to large company supply chain spending so they can grow and create new jobs. This free service offering small businesses “one-stop shopping” is powered by the IBM SmartCloud and streamlines the procurement process for both buyers and suppliers. More than 3,500 small companies already are connected to nearly 30 large-company buyers through Supplier Connection. In 2013 alone, participating corporations spent more than $1.5 billion with small businesses registered on Supplier Connection.

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Last week, IBM was pleased to meet with President Obama to discuss his SupplierPay initiative to speed payments to small businesses, and contribute our expertise on building healthier supply chains and strengthening relationships between small and large businesses. The President’s SupplierPay initiative recognizes the importance of small business to the nation’s economy. The initiative calls upon large enterprises to provide financing help to their small suppliers and to pay them faster so they can grow and create more jobs.

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In the 1960s, the world was a simpler place. The Cold War structured the international system, sovereign states were the main international actors, physical (versus virtual) warfare was the main security threat, and economic barriers limited international trade
and finance. The news cycle was longer than 24 hours, and there was no internet. But today’s states and multinational organizations share a very different world with financial institutions and corporations, non-profit organizations, terrorists, drug cartels, even pirates. “Sovereign states” aren’t as sovereign as they used to be, and security threats include vulnerable financial markets, failed states, cyber threats, infectious diseases, terrorism
and climate change.

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Today, two non-traditional actors – American private foundations and U.S. corporate philanthropies – exercise a degree of global reach and influence that once was the province of states and multinational organizations. Over just the last two decades, we have witnessed a huge increase in the number and size of private foundations and the scale of their international activities as they pursue social, economic and even political change. U.S. corporations also are increasingly global, and are involved in social, environmental, health and other public issues in the countries where they operate.

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En route to a summit with President Obama, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott visited Brooklyn’s Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) for some fact-finding and possible inspiration for a P-TECH program in Australia. Prime Minister Abbott first heard about P-TECH in President Obama’s 2012 State of the Union address. Upon his visit – during which he spoke with students, faculty and IBM mentors, and met with Principal Rashid F. Davis and myself – Mr. Abbott expressed his strong belief that P-TECH was “an innovative and valuable education model for us to consider in Australia.”

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Though P-TECH started in New York City, it’s significance is being recognized across the country and around the world. A collaboration among employers and educators to reinvent American high school, connect education to jobs and close America’s skills gap, the
P-TECH movement is rolling across New York State (16 new schools this fall, with 10 more forthcoming) and Connecticut (which opens its first P-TECH school this September), along with five schools in Chicago and other locales in the pipeline. The fact that the Prime Minister of Australia wanted to see P-TECH for himself after hearing about it from the President of the United States and his staff clearly indicates that other leading economies are seeking ways to sharpen their competitive edge by transforming their high schools,
and that the innovative P-TECH model depends less on geography than on the will to embrace change.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (center) with Founding Principal Rashid F. Davis and P-TECH faculty and students. (photo: Aaron Showalter, New York Daily News)

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (center) with Founding Principal Rashid F. Davis and P-TECH faculty and students. (photo: Aaron Showalter, New York Daily News)

The Australian economy faces many of the same challenges we see here in the U.S., including a worsening disconnect between education and industry in a time of upheaval across the higher education sector. It’s no wonder that Prime Minister Abbott would be interested in a school-to-career model designed to serve all children through a program that capitalizes on public-private partnerships, prepares its graduates for growth-industry employment, and makes these connections within existing public budgets. That’s the reason P-TECH is attracting interest from around the world and is being replicated so rapidly. Visitors from five continents have come to P-TECH to see innovation in action and get America’s best thinking on reinventing education.

Stanley S. Litow is IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs and a former Deputy Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools.

Related Resources:

New York Daily News: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott Tours P-TECH School
in Brooklyn

Sky News/Australia: Abbott Visits New York High Tech College (High School)

Financial Review: Tony Abbott Backs U.S.-Style Corporate Schools for Australia

President Praises P-TECH in State of the Union Address

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When Typhoon Yolanda (also known as Typhoon Haiyan) slammed into The Philippines last November, its devastating impact underscored the need to manage our responses to natural disasters more effectively. That is why IBM collaborated with the Philippine Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and trusted business partners immediately following the storm to develop an Intelligent Operations Center (IOC) for emergency management, and an Integrated Communications System (ICS) to enable the coordination of relief efforts across numerous government agencies. On May 29, 2014, IBM was proud to hand over the IOC and ICS to the people of The Philippines. 

IBM in The Philippines President and Country General Manager Mariels Almeda Winhoffer transfers ownership of the Intelligent Operations Center and Integrated Communications System to the Philippine Department of Science and Technology.

IBM in The Philippines President and Country General Manager Mariels Almeda Winhoffer transfers ownership of the Intelligent Operations Center and Integrated Communications System to the Philippine Department of Science and Technology.

INFOGRAPHIC: IBM Intelligent Operations Center for Emergency Management

Enabled by an IBM Impact Grant of technology and services, the integrated operations and communications systems will allow the DOST to aggregate data from disparate sources, provide emergency managers with advance warnings for extreme weather events, and gather breaking information on disaster conditions from first responders. In addition, the new systems will use data analytics to enable more sophisticated disaster scenario planning that will help integrate and streamline responses.

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Although as many as 80 percent of Ghanaian women seek prenatal care, HIV testing is often deferred due to a lack of public awareness, limited access to diagnostic tests and cultural stigma. As a tragic result, Ghana is among the world’s 22 countries with the highest burden of HIV infection in pregnant women. But Ghana is fighting back. President John Dramani Mahama recently announced the formation of a global consortium to reduce Ghana’s mother-to-child HIV transmission rate to less than one percent by 2020.

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A critical component of the success of this vital mission will be Ghana’s collaboration with researchers from the Yale School of Medicine and expert strategists from the IBM Corporate Service Corps (CSC). Using advanced IBM Data Analytics and SmartCloud infrastructure, the CSC/Yale School of Medicine team will work with Ghanaian policy makers and health care experts to design the first phase of shutting down mother-to-child HIV infection for good.

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